The Low Gravy

Music. Art. Food. Life. Down South.

Winners and Losers from 2014 SEC Media Days

The circus has packed up and left town, but the four-day extravaganza known as SEC Media Days was a fun ride along the way. With an absence of star power on the player side, it was up to the coaches to entertain the nearly 1,300 credentialed members of the media on hand at the Hyatt Regency Wynfrey Hotel in suburban Birmingham. 

Who were some of the winners and losers of this year’s SEC media days? The Bleacher Report’s picks are in this slideshow.


http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2132624-winners-and-losers-from-2014-sec-media-days
A Fresh Look: Buttermilk

July 16, 2014

By Jenna Grem, Southern Foodways Alliance


Last February, Garden & Gun magazine’s Robert Moss explained the difference between the “buttermilk” you might find at your local supermarket, and the rare, traditional buttermilk that is a product of—what else?—churning butter. That’s the kind on which Earl Cruze, SFA’s 2008 Ruth Fertel Keeper of the Flame Award winner, has built his reputation. 

http://www.southernfoodways.org/a-fresh-look-buttermilk/
southernglossary:

Top Shelf Comics just released the cover for March: Book Two 
Part of a trilogy, March: Book Two will continue the story of John Lewis, whose life started on a sharecropping farm in rural Alabama and ended up as one of the most respected representatives of the US Congress. He was deeply involved with the organization of the Civil Rights protests in the 1950s and 1960s.

Nate Powell’s powerful cover showcases (on top) the Freedom Riders’ bus set on fire by a white supremacist mob in Anniston, AL, May 14, 1961, and (on bottom) Lewis’ fiery speech at the March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

Read our feature article about artist Nate Powell and how his Southern background helped prepare him to draw this monumental series.

southernglossary:

Top Shelf Comics just released the cover for March: Book Two 

Part of a trilogy, March: Book Two will continue the story of John Lewis, whose life started on a sharecropping farm in rural Alabama and ended up as one of the most respected representatives of the US Congress. He was deeply involved with the organization of the Civil Rights protests in the 1950s and 1960s.

Nate Powell’s powerful cover showcases (on top) the Freedom Riders’ bus set on fire by a white supremacist mob in Anniston, AL, May 14, 1961, and (on bottom) Lewis’ fiery speech at the March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

Read our feature article about artist Nate Powell and how his Southern background helped prepare him to draw this monumental series.

Johnny Cash’s ‘Bitter Tears’ Fall Again

Tribute album set for 50th anniversary of iconic Cash collection

In 1964, Johnny Cash released Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian, a concept album that served to draw attention to the plight of Native Americans. On August 19th, in celebration of the project’s 50th anniversary, Sony Music Masterworks will issue Look Again to the Wind: Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Revisited. The original disc’s material has been reinterpreted for the new collection by Cash disciples Kris Kristofferson, Emmylou Harris and Steve Earle, among others, and was recorded in Los Angeles, Nashville and at the legendary Cash Cabin in Hendersonville, Tennessee.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/johnny-cashs-bitter-tears-fall-again-20140714

Photo by Gai Terrell/Redferns

theoxfordamerican:

This week’s Eyes on the South: photographer Brian Anderson keeps coming back to the Hernando de Soto bridge.

thepenguinpress:

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD was released 54 years ago today! Celebrate the anniversary with the recently released ebook and THE MOCKINGBIRD NEXT DOOR: Life with Harper Lee, out on Monday!

thepenguinpress:

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD was released 54 years ago today! Celebrate the anniversary with the recently released ebook and THE MOCKINGBIRD NEXT DOOR: Life with Harper Lee, out on Monday!

thepenguinpress:

via Flavorwire
Harper Lee’s charming letter to a fan, circa 1960

thepenguinpress:

via Flavorwire

Harper Lee’s charming letter to a fan, circa 1960

facesofmemphis:

[I’ve talked to Nate plenty of times; I bring my every Memphis visitor to Ernestine and Hazel’s, take them up the rickety steps, past the  dim rooms, old brothel rooms, and back to Nate’s Bar. But I can’t remember a thing we’ve ever talked about. I don’t even remember if he is from Memphis (the eternal question comes up in every first interaction: Are you from here.) All I know is he smiles and smiles and he loves people, you can tell. ]

facesofmemphis:

[I’ve talked to Nate plenty of times; I bring my every Memphis visitor to Ernestine and Hazel’s, take them up the rickety steps, past the  dim rooms, old brothel rooms, and back to Nate’s Bar. But I can’t remember a thing we’ve ever talked about. I don’t even remember if he is from Memphis (the eternal question comes up in every first interaction: Are you from here.) All I know is he smiles and smiles and he loves people, you can tell. ]

facesofmemphis:

"What’s been the best part of your day so far?""Tonight, right now, standing in front of the Arcade and watching the scenery and the people go by. The heart and soul of Memphis is right here."

facesofmemphis:

"What’s been the best part of your day so far?"
"Tonight, right now, standing in front of the Arcade and watching the scenery and the people go by. The heart and soul of Memphis is right here."