The Low Gravy

Music. Art. Food. Life. Down South.

Generations
Carving Their Niche: Kingsport Residents Create a Lasting Legacy for Community Carousel

“When pigs fly.” That was Valerie Joh’s knee-jerk reaction when, in 2008, her husband, Gale, surprised her by declaring that Kingsport (TN) needed a carousel like the one in his hometown of Binghamton, N.Y.


http://tnhomeandfarm.com/kingsport-residents-carve-niche-community-carousel

Carving Their Niche: Kingsport Residents Create a Lasting Legacy for Community Carousel

“When pigs fly.” That was Valerie Joh’s knee-jerk reaction when, in 2008, her husband, Gale, surprised her by declaring that Kingsport (TN) needed a carousel like the one in his hometown of Binghamton, N.Y.


http://tnhomeandfarm.com/kingsport-residents-carve-niche-community-carousel

Southern Music’s Forgotten Masters

In celebration of its twentieth anniversary, the Hillsborough, North Carolina-based Music Maker Relief Foundation has launched an exhibition that pays tribute to an older generation of blues musicians.

The exhibit, which includes photographs, paintings, instruments, and multimedia clips, will be housed at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts through August 29 before it heads to the ArtsCenter in Carrboro, North Carolina, on October 1, with more tour dates to be announced soon on the foundation’s website.

http://gardenandgun.com/gallery/southern-musics-forgotten-masters
bad-postcards:

THE COUNTRY OF TEXAS

A TEXAS “HOWDY”…
Everything you want in one state you’ll find the most of in Texas: It’s the biggest, the hottest, coldest, wildest, ruggedest country on earth. In short, (if anything can be in Texas), it’s the “greatest” hunk of land in this, and nearly any other, Union. In true Texas tradition everything is colossal…from the mountains, deserts, green pastures, ranches and rivers scattered at random over 260,000 square miles, to the pink grapefruit, red sunsets and blankets of bluebonnets. All this, plus enough natural gas under it to float it away, but enough dough, dogies and derricks to keep it ‘hog-tied’ — combines to produce that special breed called “Texan”. The tall men, tall-tales, long-horn steers and pretty gals are enough to shut my mouth and just say…”Howdy, from Texas!”

bad-postcards:

THE COUNTRY OF TEXAS

A TEXAS “HOWDY”…

Everything you want in one state you’ll find the most of in Texas: It’s the biggest, the hottest, coldest, wildest, ruggedest country on earth. In short, (if anything can be in Texas), it’s the “greatest” hunk of land in this, and nearly any other, Union. In true Texas tradition everything is colossal…from the mountains, deserts, green pastures, ranches and rivers scattered at random over 260,000 square miles, to the pink grapefruit, red sunsets and blankets of bluebonnets. All this, plus enough natural gas under it to float it away, but enough dough, dogies and derricks to keep it ‘hog-tied’ — combines to produce that special breed called “Texan”. The tall men, tall-tales, long-horn steers and pretty gals are enough to shut my mouth and just say…”Howdy, from Texas!”

(via countryhixs)

americansongwriter:

Q&A With Sturgill Simpson
Sturgill Simpson‘s Metamodern Sounds in Country Music is not quite like anything else you’ll probably hear this summer. It has deep roots in much-loved country music traditions – parts of it could pass as lost tapes of The Outlaws – but it explores the self and relationships with others using Buddhism and psychedelic experiences, among other points of reference. It’s a work that successfully blends trucking anthems, English pop hits from a quarter-century ago and psychedelicmusique concrète freakouts. Just before the album hit physical and digital shelves in May, American Songwriter caught up with Simpson to learn how he pulled that off.
Click here to read more

americansongwriter:

Q&A With Sturgill Simpson

Sturgill Simpson‘s Metamodern Sounds in Country Music is not quite like anything else you’ll probably hear this summer. It has deep roots in much-loved country music traditions – parts of it could pass as lost tapes of The Outlaws – but it explores the self and relationships with others using Buddhism and psychedelic experiences, among other points of reference. It’s a work that successfully blends trucking anthems, English pop hits from a quarter-century ago and psychedelicmusique concrète freakouts. Just before the album hit physical and digital shelves in May, American Songwriter caught up with Simpson to learn how he pulled that off.

Click here to read more

Wanted: Partner to join me in fighting the system like two modern day Robin Hoods. Must like Waylon. Cousins preferred.
Winners and Losers from 2014 SEC Media Days

The circus has packed up and left town, but the four-day extravaganza known as SEC Media Days was a fun ride along the way. With an absence of star power on the player side, it was up to the coaches to entertain the nearly 1,300 credentialed members of the media on hand at the Hyatt Regency Wynfrey Hotel in suburban Birmingham. 

Who were some of the winners and losers of this year’s SEC media days? The Bleacher Report’s picks are in this slideshow.


http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2132624-winners-and-losers-from-2014-sec-media-days
A Fresh Look: Buttermilk

July 16, 2014

By Jenna Grem, Southern Foodways Alliance


Last February, Garden & Gun magazine’s Robert Moss explained the difference between the “buttermilk” you might find at your local supermarket, and the rare, traditional buttermilk that is a product of—what else?—churning butter. That’s the kind on which Earl Cruze, SFA’s 2008 Ruth Fertel Keeper of the Flame Award winner, has built his reputation. 

http://www.southernfoodways.org/a-fresh-look-buttermilk/
southernglossary:

Top Shelf Comics just released the cover for March: Book Two 
Part of a trilogy, March: Book Two will continue the story of John Lewis, whose life started on a sharecropping farm in rural Alabama and ended up as one of the most respected representatives of the US Congress. He was deeply involved with the organization of the Civil Rights protests in the 1950s and 1960s.

Nate Powell’s powerful cover showcases (on top) the Freedom Riders’ bus set on fire by a white supremacist mob in Anniston, AL, May 14, 1961, and (on bottom) Lewis’ fiery speech at the March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

Read our feature article about artist Nate Powell and how his Southern background helped prepare him to draw this monumental series.

southernglossary:

Top Shelf Comics just released the cover for March: Book Two 

Part of a trilogy, March: Book Two will continue the story of John Lewis, whose life started on a sharecropping farm in rural Alabama and ended up as one of the most respected representatives of the US Congress. He was deeply involved with the organization of the Civil Rights protests in the 1950s and 1960s.

Nate Powell’s powerful cover showcases (on top) the Freedom Riders’ bus set on fire by a white supremacist mob in Anniston, AL, May 14, 1961, and (on bottom) Lewis’ fiery speech at the March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

Read our feature article about artist Nate Powell and how his Southern background helped prepare him to draw this monumental series.

Johnny Cash’s ‘Bitter Tears’ Fall Again

Tribute album set for 50th anniversary of iconic Cash collection

In 1964, Johnny Cash released Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian, a concept album that served to draw attention to the plight of Native Americans. On August 19th, in celebration of the project’s 50th anniversary, Sony Music Masterworks will issue Look Again to the Wind: Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Revisited. The original disc’s material has been reinterpreted for the new collection by Cash disciples Kris Kristofferson, Emmylou Harris and Steve Earle, among others, and was recorded in Los Angeles, Nashville and at the legendary Cash Cabin in Hendersonville, Tennessee.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/johnny-cashs-bitter-tears-fall-again-20140714

Photo by Gai Terrell/Redferns